Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

If one sign of a great theologian is his ability to sieze hold of the imagination of his readers witha single line, to disturb them, to fascinate them, to make them think, then Forsyth ranks near the top.  Here's a few to start the week:

`None but the great theologies of redemption are adequate to the great tragedies of the world.'
`An undogmatic Christ is the advertisement of a dying faith.'
`The peace of God is not a glassy calm but a mighty confidence.'
`The seat of revelation is in the Cross, and not in the heart.'
`Look to the Gospel, and it will see to the experience.'

And a particular favourite of mine: `Half gospels have no dignity and no future.  Like the famous mule, they have neither pride of ancestry nor hope of posterity.'

Posted on Friday, February 09, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

This is the quickest way to say thank you to the numerous readers of the Ref21 blog who have graciously taken the time to send in condolences and assurances of prayer regarding the death of Alan Groves, a dear friend and much-missed colleague. His funeral has just taken place and was both a heartbreaking and yet joyous occasion where the minister pointed those present beyond the grave to the greater hope of the resurrection, a topic on which Al talked much in the final few months.  Sin and death are outrageous and chaotic invasions of God's creation; the only solution lies in the subversion of death through Christ's resurrection.

The memorial service is tomorrow at 2.  Details on the Westminster webpage (www.wts.edu).

Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

There is an obituary of J Alan Groves posted on the Westminster website, www.wts.edu, and a moving account of his last day on the family blog at www.algroves.info.  In times of such loss, it is good to remember that Christianity is not a religion of healing -- such has nothing to say in the face of death; it is a religion of resurrection.

Posted on Wednesday, January 31, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

Some weeks back I noted a leading emergent webpage which spends it's time telling the reader how important and radical (in the Starbucks latte drinking sense of the word....) the particular person who writes on it is.  I raised the question of how, in the marketplace of ideas, Christians can promote the good and the true without promoting themselves.  In this context, I'm struck by the following comment from good old P T Forsyth, scarcely a conservative evangelical but a whole lot wiser than the emergent person on said website, and any who are tempted to think too highly of themselves, whatever their theological conviction:

Posted on Thursday, January 25, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

Once again, I put aside joking around just for a minute to ask blog readers to pray for my colleague, Alan Groves, and his family, as he struggles with cancer.  See http://www.algroves.info/

Posted on Thursday, January 18, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

Some more from Forsyth.  Theologians who have the gift of words that set minds on fire should be read:

Posted on Thursday, January 18, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

Follwing up on yesterday's blog and one one I posted a week or so ago, I would want to make the case that the problem with so many postmodern approaches to the world is that they fail to grasp the tragic nature of the human situation.  By dissolving the tragedies of life through moral and epistemological relativism, they really fail to be prophetic.  Only as these tragic dimensions are grasped do truly great theology and reflections on life emerge, why Augustine, Owen and Pascal are giants, and why Euripides and Shakespeare are still worth reading (incidentally, this is why satire is vastly superior to other forms of comedy, why Seinfeld is worth watching and Friends worth avoiding -- though my fear is that too many trendy theologians tend to Friends and Starbucks as the barometers of reality rather than Monty Python, British Instant Coffee and American attempts to make tea -- now there's a taste of the tragedy of life for you)

Posted on Wednesday, January 17, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

I hate to break up the hilarity in which my good friends Messrs Trotter and Plectrum-Smith seem to be indulging, but I just spent a few moments looking at the webpage of a leading Emergent figure.

Posted on Thursday, January 11, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

I found myself in the invidious position of having to issue a clarification and apology for a theological analysis of an American "sport" (sic):

Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 by Carl Trueman on Postcards from Palookaville

There's a fascinating interview with N T Wright in the latest Christianity Today.  Worth reading as a whole but  I was particularly struck by the following comment: