Facing Our Fear of Failure

We never forget our spectacular failures; but more often than not, the fear, regret, and embarrassment evaporate, leaving behind the residue of a humorous story. After we have healed, what remains is the callous of proven resilience. At least, that’s how we should work through our failures in light of God’s sovereignty and goodness.

We never forget our spectacular failures; but more often than not, the fear, regret, and embarrassment evaporate, leaving behind the residue of a humorous story. After we have healed, what remains is the callous of proven resilience. At least, that’s how we should work through our failures in light of God’s sovereignty and goodness. Granted, this pattern does not apply so much to moral failures, or deep trauma, though those episodes can still result in redemptive value.

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Take and Read

You'll thank me.

 

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Friday: Hiding in Thee

Theme: To God Be the Glory

This week’s lessons teach us of the need to rest in the Lord during difficult trials, and to praise him for his faithful care.

Scripture: Psalm 57:1-11

So I apply the psalm here, asking: Are you faithful in this sense? Is your heart steadfast? Alexander Maclaren has a sermon on this verse titled "The Fixed Heart" in which he provides some wise words and asks some searching questions:

So I apply the psalm here, asking: Are you faithful in this sense? Is your heart steadfast? Alexander Maclaren has a sermon on this verse titled "The Fixed Heart" in which he provides some wise words and asks some searching questions:

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Thursday: Hiding in Thee

Theme: A Heightened Testimony

This week’s lessons teach us of the need to rest in the Lord during difficult trials, and to praise him for his faithful care.

Scripture: Psalm 57:1-11

I want to deal now with part two of this psalm, holding consideration of the chorus or refrain for last. Generally speaking, part two has the same themes as part one. But I want you to see how they are introduced and what happens to them the second time around. Seeing this will help you to understand something about Hebrew poetry.

I want to deal now with part two of this psalm, holding consideration of the chorus or refrain for last. Generally speaking, part two has the same themes as part one. But I want you to see how they are introduced and what happens to them the second time around. Seeing this will help you to understand something about Hebrew poetry.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

The Pink Elephant in the Room

Current discussions of the Pence Rule and friendship seem to ignore the pink elephant in the room.

Amid all of the discussion surrounding the so-called Pence Rule and also the forthcoming book from my friend, Aimee Byrd, there is one lacuna that is slightly puzzling.

 

 

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Postcards from Palookaville
postcards-from-palookaville

Ascension Hymns

The work of the resurrection is not complete until the ascension of Christ when he returns to the right hand of the Father in human form and in power and authority.

The season of Easter draws to a close with the Ascension and Pentecost—the final days of the earthly ministry of Christ and the birthday of the church. There’s a very real sense in which the work of the resurrection is not complete until the ascension of Christ when he returns to the right hand of the Father in human form and in power and authority. This is the ultimate defeating of death: “The Lord says to my Lord: “Sit at my right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool.” Psalm 110:1

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Christward Collective is a conversation of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Christward Collective and the mission of the Alliance.

Wednesday: Hiding in Thee

Theme: Safe in God's Shadow

This week’s lessons teach us of the need to rest in the Lord during difficult trials, and to praise him for his faithful care.

Scripture: Psalm 57:1-11

The wings of God. The problem with the first image has led other commentators to explain David's reference as to the wings of God himself. To the objection that God does not have wings or that the image is unworthy of the Almighty we answer that God speaks along these lines himself in several places. Indeed, the earliest biblical use of the word "wings" is an example. In Exodus 19:4, God declares, "You yourselves have seen what I did to Egypt, and how I carried you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself." This initial use of the image later lends itself to several variations. Thus, in the Song of Moses God is compared to an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, that spreads its wings to catch them and carries them on its pinions (Deut. 32:11).

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Will the Real Potiphar's Wife Please Stand?

I'm still sitting.

“We should be friends,” quoth Potiphar’s wife;
but Joseph turned, and ran for his life.
“Avoidance is not purity!,”
she cried; but he ignored her plea.
 
One example from Scripture that I often hear to support the Mike Pence or Billy Graham Rule is Potiphar’s wife. I’ve heard, “If Joseph followed the Mike Pence Rule, he would never have gotten himself in this trouble.” He is also used as a warning for men not to trust women's accusations of sexual abuse.

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Mortification of Spin is a casual conversation of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Mortification of Spin and the mission of the Alliance.

Tuesday: Hiding in Thee

Theme: Asking for Mercy

This week’s lessons teach us of the need to rest in the Lord during difficult trials, and to praise him for his faithful care.

Scripture: Psalm 57:1-11

The first of the psalm's two parts begins with David asking for mercy, even as he takes refuge in God. Since the title of the psalm speaks of the cave in which David was hiding, it is natural to think that the cave suggested the idea of a "refuge.” But we should notice that David does not call the cave his refuge, though it was a refuge in a certain physical sense. Rather it is God whom he calls his refuge. Indeed, to use the image of the second half of verse 1, although David may have been hidden physically in the dark shadows of the vast cave of Adullam, he knows that it is actually under the shadow of the wings of God that he has found safety.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

When You Go Through the Valley

We can rest assured that our Savior knows the way through whatever valley we walk. He knows what it is to feel the shadows of death creep over him. He knows what it is to face evil, temptation, enemies, and emotional turmoil. 

On a recent trip to Israel, I had the privilege of walking where Jesus walked. Our group also explored sites and locations of important places and events in the Old Testament. After spending a couple of days in the Jordan River Valley, we headed west toward Jerusalem. We read through the Psalms of Assent as we followed the path Israelite pilgrims took on their yearly visit to the Temple. On the way, we stopped at the Valley of the Shadow of Death.

The Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals is member supported and operates only by your faithful support. Thank you.

Christward Collective is a conversation of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Christward Collective and the mission of the Alliance.

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